Free Casio EX-Z55 Digital Camera

Free digital camera

Retail: $349 (FREE with purchase of Casio XJ-360 or XJ-560 projector.)

The Casio EX-Z55 Exilim is a thin, stylish, 5 megapixel digital camera with 3X optical zoom. Features large, 2.5-inch LCD monitor screen and a SUPER LIFE BATTERY: approximately 400 shots on a single charge. That’s 10% longer than the previous model (EX-Z40), with a greater number of pixels and a larger display screen.

Limit one camera per customer. Offer good thru 7/31/2005 or while supplies last. Please contact your sales representative when placing your order. Visit ProjectorPeople.com for other rebates and special offers: http://www.projectorpeople.com/projectors/projector-rebates.asp.

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How to Shop for a Home Theater Projector

Typical Home Theater Setup How can you tell if the price is right for a home theater projector? Projector People offers you shopping tips for the best buys in home projection. Read on.

Determine Your Price Range

It’s always a good idea to determine a budget before making a major purchase. For an idea of how much to allow for this purchase you can look at package offers. Even if the products in the special offers are not what you want, it can at least give you a general idea of what a system costs. In a front projection home theater system, your projector should be your most expensive line item, because it will be the primary focus. Surround sound speakers, a screen, a projector mount, and other components such as a DVD player will round out your total package. See our Typical Home Theater Scenario for more information.

Basic Specs to Check

The specifications that have the greatest impact on projector price are internal technology, brightness, and resolution. Here is a quick look at which specs cost more and which typically cost less.
Typical Specs and Price Breakdown
Specification Costs Less Costs More
Resolution WVGA (854×480) WXGA (1280×720)
Brightness 700 lumens 1000+ lumens
Technology LCD DLP™

Features that Add Value

Beyond the basic specifications there are additional features that add value to a projector purchase. These extras should be factored into the overall value of the projector you choose.
  • Lower noise level – Less than 30 dB is preferable
  • Zoom lenses are more desirable than fixed lenses.
  • Multiple video inputs are a plus
  • Longer lamp life will save money down the line
Mitsubishi projectors such as the HC3 have a feature called “Natural Color Matrix” which is a color adjustment system that allows users to adjust a wider spectrum of color. Beyond the usual RGB (red, green, blue) to include a broader YMC (Yellow, Magenta, and Cyan) adjustment, Natural Color Matrix allows each of the six colors to be individually adjusted without affecting the hues of the other spectrum colors. For example, red can be increased to appear richer and more intense without altering yellow and magenta.

Special Offers and Rebates

Don’t forget to factor in the manufacturer and reseller incentives available on specific models. High-volume purchases by resellers and end-of-life specials from manufacturers are great ways to save money or add value to your purchase. Projector People is currently offering a number of special offers on home theater projectors, some of which are exclusive to ProjectorPeople.com. Check out our rebates and promotions for current specials.   , , ,

Color Critical Applications and Projectors

Just a few years ago, there was no standard for interpreting colors on computers, monitors, printers, projectors, digital cameras and other peripherals. The lack of standardization created problems for professionals who rely on accurate color such as advertisers, photographers, biologists, architects, and more. So the stage was set to determine a standard ‘color space’ which would allow display devices and computers to see and display colors uniformly.

sRGB on and off

What is a color space?

A color space is a model for representing color numerically in terms of three or more coordinates. In order for color to be reproduced predictably from one device to another, each device (projector, printer, monitor, etc.) has to be responsible for accurately recreating color, and for matching the six parameters of color. The six different parameters which define every color are: luminance, hue, color saturation, and RGB (red, green, and blue) values. In order to define a standard color space for all devices, Microsoft worked with top manufacturers of the most commonly used devices. The standard color space they developed is known as sRGB.

What is sRGB?

SRGB was developed in October 1999 and defined with specifications compliant to the International Color Consortium’s – IEC 61966-2-1 – color standard. It is a system of color spaces that determines tone, saturation, and brightness. This enables computer operating systems to easily decode and translate color expression into actual color displays. Testing methods and evaluation criteria for compliance of projectors were partly developed by Mitsubishi Electric with full support and endorsement from Microsoft Corporation.

Potential Drawbacks of sRGB

The sRGB standard has received some criticism from those who have worked extensively in digital photography or graphic arts because the sRGB color space is smaller than another common standard, Adobe RGB 1998. Adobe RGB is a ‘larger’ color space that allows for a wider range of colors. This standard was created to allow users access to the entire spectrum of color possible when printing. The sRGB standard, on the other hand, was designed to provide the same level of flexibility on a monitor. In fact, according to Popular Photography magazine online (www.popphoto.com), sRGB is “…ideal for images destined to be viewed on a monitor or digital projector. We’ve also found it works better when sending images to digital minilabs or to online photo processors.”

Beyond sRGB

If you find the sRGB color space limiting, you might want to consider a projector that allows for a more ‘tweakable’ color experience. Mitsubishi projectors, for example, have a feature called “Natural Color Matrix” which is a color adjustment system that allows users to adjust a wider spectrum of color. Beyond the usual RGB (red, green, blue) to include a broader YMC (Yellow, Magenta, and Cyan) adjustment, Natural Color Matrix allows each of the six colors to be individually adjusted without affecting the hues of the other spectrum colors. For example, red can be increased to appear richer and more intense without altering yellow and magenta. Natural Color Matrix